​​​CVMA CHapter 10-2 is a charitable organization per IRC 501 (c) (19) 

 "The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly  proportional to how they perceive the Veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their nation."
                                                                                                                                         President George Washington

​​​​​​ ​​[*]       Walgreens HERO program to hire 5,000 veterans:
            Walgreens recently announced a commitment to hire 5,000 Veterans over the course of five years though their Helping Veterans with Educational and Retail Opportunities Program (HERO). Walgreens established the HERO program for Veterans to transition the leadership skills learned through military service into a retail management career such as assistant store manager trainee and shift lead.
Participants in the program will have the opportunity to work towards a bachelor’s degree with tuition assistance and discounts available. Also, the GI Bill paired through Southern New Hampshire University provides a  guaranteed 80-90% coverage of tuition costs to achieve a bachelor’s degree.
                        Benefits to the program include:
                        On the job mentorship
                        New team member and program support
                        New student support through Southern New Hampshire University
                        LEAP Program Retail Management Training – Plus more!


[*]       Lowe’s new partnerships to help veterans with job training, housing and more:
            Lowe’s Home Improvement just announced new partnerships with three military service organizations designed  to help veterans in multiple aspects of their transitions.
            The United Service Organizations, American Veterans and Operation FINALLY HOME can now all connect the veterans they work with to the resources Lowe’s has in place for job training, affordable housing and educational scholarships. “We look forward to working closely with each organization to serve the military community through programs focused on safe, affordable housing and transitioning military into dynamic careers,” said Joe  McFarland, executive vice president at Lowe’s and a Marine Corps veteran,
            USO, for example, will provide service members and their spouses with “interactive workshops and networking             opportunities designed to help them land apprenticeships and jobs in the skills trade,” said USO Chief Development and Marketing Officer Lisa Anastasi in the same press release.
            AMVETS plans to contribute “scholarships and workforce training,” according to the press release. It plans to reach 3 million veterans through this partnership with Lowe’s, said AMVETS National Commander Rege Riley in that press release.

 [*]       New GI Bill transfer rule will impact older service members:
            Long-serving troops and reservists have a little less than two months remaining to transfer their Post 9-/11 GI Bill benefits to their spouse or children before a new restriction kicks in on July 12.
            While soldiers still must serve for six years before being allowed to request a GI Bill transfer, they will no longer have the opportunity to do so after they have served longer than 16 years.
            This new rule will affect senior active-duty personnel and those who for whatever reason are unable to transfer any portion of their benefits to one or more dependents before that July 12 deadline.  The GI Bill transfer rules had been previously amended in 2018 so that troops with more than 10 years in uniform could no longer be excepted from a four-year service commitment if they wanted to transfer their benefits, including those who were forced into mandatory retirement.


​[*]       Plans to combat veterans suicide, boost VA benefits move ahead:
                 House lawmakers passed a series of nine veterans-themed bills, including several focused on suicide prevention.
            All of the measures must still be approved by the Senate before becoming law. But House lawmakers said the moves are an important effort to highlight the issue of veterans mental health to the public, and to push the Department of Veterans Affairs into quicker action.
            “The sad statistic shows after the 20 veterans and military service members who die by suicide, 14 of those 20 have not received VA health care,” said Rep. Mark Takano, D-Calif. and chairman of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee, before the votes on Tuesday. “This is one step toward changing this tragic number.”  All nine of the measures passed without objection. Several require more information from VA on mental health and suicide prevention efforts, including a measure from Rep. Max Rose, D-N.Y., which would require quicker notification to Congress of suicide attempts on department campuses.
            The chamber also advanced a measure from committee ranking member Phil Roe, R-Tenn., to expand eligibility for readjustment counseling that previously excluded members of the Coast Guard, National Guard and reserves.
            The slate of veterans bills also included the annual cost-of-living adjustment for veterans benefits for next year.
            The measure is a relatively non-controversial issue each year, tying the annual boost for a host of veterans benefits to the scheduled annual hike in Social Security benefits. Due to existing rules, lawmakers must pass the legislation each year, despite past efforts to make the cost-of-living increases automatic.
            Senate leaders have not said when they may consider voting on the legislation. 

[*]       SSA benefit increase - H.R.860 | Social Security 2100 Act:
           The interest in strengthening the adequacy of Social Security benefits, while making the program solvent well into the future, is evident in the growing support for U.S. Representative John Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act (H.R. 860) which he introduced with 200 House co-sponsors. The bill: · Modestly strengthens benefits of all Social Security beneficiaries with a monthly benefit boost. · Uses the Consumer Price Index for the Elderly (CPI-E) to increase the COLA, which would result in higher benefits over the course of a retirement. · Increases the minimum Social Security benefit to ensure that the lowest benefit is 125% of the annual poverty guidelines. · Lifts the income thresholds for federal income taxation of Social Security benefits from $25,000 to $50,000 for single filers and from $32,000 to $100,000 for joint filers, so that retirees with more modest incomes can keep more of their money. The bill pays for boosting benefits and addresses Social Security’s solvency by applying the Social Security payroll tax to all earnings above $400,000, and would allow credit for those earnings above $400,000 to be used in calculating slightly higher Social Security benefits. In addition, the bill would very gradually increase the payroll tax rate by 0.1 percentage point each year starting in 2020 until reaching 14.8% in 2043 and later. (Currently the payroll tax rate is 12.4%, with employees and employers each paying 6.2%.).


​[*]       VA healing/recovery programs - H.R 2435 | Accelerating Veterans Recovery Outdoors Act:
          Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ) on 1 MAY reintroduced bipartisan legislation, HR 2435, to help military veterans heal and seek treatment through outdoor recreation, by providing them better access to federal lands. “Veterans hospitals are renowned for intricate and comprehensive specialty surgeries and treatments, but we can and should do more,” said Smith, former Veterans Committee Chairman and author of the Veterans Health Programs Improvement Act (P.L. 108-422), which authorized new research and education centers for treating veterans with complex multi-trauma combat injuries; today there are five major polytrauma rehabilitation centers. “Studies have shown—and veterans organizations strongly concur—that outdoor recreational activities can provide powerful therapeutic and healing benefits as well as camaraderie for veterans struggling with combat-related injuries or post-traumatic stress,” said Smith. “We should be thinking outside-the-box to discover as many ways as possible to help veterans, and opening up federal lands and removing barriers to access for remedial outdoor recreation is a nobrainer. My legislation would help increase access to this treatment option.”


[*]       SSA benefit increase - H.R.860 | Social Security 2100 Act:
          The interest in strengthening the adequacy of Social Security benefits, while making the program solvent well into the future, is evident in the growing support for U.S. Representative John Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act (H.R. 860) which he introduced with 200 House co-sponsors. The bill: · Modestly strengthens benefits of all Social Security beneficiaries with a monthly benefit boost. · Uses the Consumer Price Index for the Elderly (CPI-E) to increase the COLA, which would result in higher benefits over the course of a retirement. · Increases the minimum Social Security benefit to ensure that the lowest benefit is 125% of the annual poverty guidelines. · Lifts the income thresholds for federal income taxation of Social Security benefits from $25,000 to $50,000 for single filers and from $32,000 to $100,000 for joint filers, so that retirees with more modest incomes can keep more of their money. The bill pays for boosting benefits and addresses Social Security’s solvency by applying the Social Security payroll tax to all earnings above $400,000, and would allow credit for those earnings above $400,000 to be used in calculating slightly higher Social Security benefits. In addition, the bill would very gradually increase the payroll tax rate by 0.1 percentage point each year starting in 2020 until reaching 14.8% in 2043 and later. (Currently the payroll tax rate is 12.4%, with employees and employers each paying 6.2%.).